Chanctonbury Ring


Attributes:
Countryside
Washington


Title: Chanctonbury Ring
Description: One of the most famous landmarks in Sussex, Chanctonbury Ring is set up in the South Downs and is some 783 feet (240 metres) high. The remains of an Iron Age hill fort plus three Roman buildings are located at the top, just below the surface of the ground.

Address: Off Chanctonbury Ring Road, Nr Buncton, Washington, West Sussex
Post Code:

Further Information:
One of the most famous landmarks in Sussex, Chanctonbury Ring is set up in the South Downs and is some 783 feet (240 metres) high. Dating from the sixth or fifth centuries BC, the outer ring of this early Iron Age hill fort measures 550ft (170 metres) by 400ft (120 metres) and is roughly oval.

Successive archaeological digs have taken place and the remains of three Roman buildings revealed. Probably built between the mid-first and fourth centuries, a flint and brick temple sits in the middle of the ring with its entrance in the eastern wall. Just north of this entrance is a small building with clay covered inner walls and the remains of a fire inside, this suggests its use as an oven. The third building, which is also of brick and flint construction, lies to the southwest of the temple and is thought to be Romano-British; its purpose is unclear.

In 1760 the twenty-year-old Charles Goring (the heir to the Goring inheritance) planted the famous ring of beech trees. At the time there was a great deal of local objection, but Charles carried on relentlessly and had water transported to the top until the trees roots had taken hold. He died 65 years later having seen the trees mature. The ring of trees was severely damaged in the storm of 1987, although they have since been replanted.